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A Word with Aramide

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Welcome to A Word With Aramide. I document my film reviews, interviews, TV overviews, and life in general.

All inquiries: aramide.tinubu@gmail.com

Tribeca Interviews: Filmmaker Christopher Bell Discusses ‘Prescription Thugs’ and Addiction

Tribeca Interviews: Filmmaker Christopher Bell Discusses ‘Prescription Thugs’ and Addiction

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Director: Christopher Bell. Courtesy of Coco Knudson Photography We’re all addicted to something. It could be food, intimacy, exercise or even a TV show. Depending on what our addiction is, we may try to hide it because we are fearful of being judged by society. It seems, however, that it is society itself that can help lead us down that path. In fact, from the time we enter school, followed shortly by our first internship and job, we are taught to work through pain and to never truly talk about our issues in fear of showing weakness in a competitive environment. Additionally, we must pay our bills and take care of our families, so losing workdays is not an option for many of us (and paid sick days as well as vacation days are limited in numbers nationwide, and often dependent on experience and longevity at a company). With medications that combat everything from pain to restlessness, it’s natural to seek out remedies to help soothe any ailments you may have, whether they are physical or emotional. However, many of these medications, specifically prescription pain pills, are highly addictive. Since they are so readily available, it’s easy to see how one can spiral into addiction, especially in a society that is often deemed to be “overworked and overstressed.” And once you’re dependent on something, it can be nearly impossible, if not fatal, to pull yourself out of it.

Continue Reading at GALO Magazine.

When Betty Met Sally: On 'Mad Men's Finale

When Betty Met Sally: On 'Mad Men's Finale

Director Elizabeth Giamatti Talks ‘A Woman Like Me,’ Accepting the Unacceptable and Her Good Friend Alex

Director Elizabeth Giamatti Talks ‘A Woman Like Me,’ Accepting the Unacceptable and Her Good Friend Alex